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Anthony Artino Anthony Artino
Interim Associate Dean for Evaluation and Educational Research
Professor of Health, Human Function, and Rehabilitation Sciences

Office Phone: 202-994-9528
Email: Email
Department: Health, Human Function, and Rehabilitation Sciences

Education

  • BS Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1995
  • MS Physiology, Colorado State University, 1996
  • MS Instructional Systems, Florida State University, 2005
  • PhD Educational Psychology, University of Connecticut, 2008

Biography

Anthony Artino is a tenured Professor in the Department of Health, Human Function, and Rehabilitation Sciences at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS). He received his PhD in educational psychology from the University of Connecticut and, prior to joining SMHS in the spring of 2020, served as Professor and Deputy Director for the Center of Health Professions Education at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. While serving in this role, Dr. Artino was an active duty Naval Officer, accruing more than 23 years of leadership experience and retiring in 2020 as a Captain in the U.S. Navy’s Medical Service Corps. In his current role at SMHS, Dr. Artino teaches graduate courses, conducts research, mentors students and junior faculty, and provides administrative leadership in evaluation and educational research.

As a researcher, he has been the principal or associate investigator on several extramurally funded research projects. His most highly cited works are a blend of research and education articles on topics ranging from analyzing and interpreting survey data, understanding academic motivation and self-regulated learning among medical students and practicing physicians, measuring long-term physician outcomes, and developing surveys for educational research. Dr. Artino is deputy editor for the Journal of Graduate Medical Education, assistant editor for Academic Medicine, and associate editor for Perspectives on Medical Education. He is also a Fellow of the Association for Medical Education in Europe and the Aerospace Medical Association. Dr. Artino has published and presented around the globe on topics ranging from self-regulated learning and assessment to scholarly dissemination and the responsible conduct of research.

Awards

Dr. Artino’s research contributions in medical and health professions education have been acknowledged nationally and internationally with several research awards, including the Silver Quill Award from Medical Education; the Outstanding Publication Award from Division I of the American Educational Research Association (twice), as well as its Established Investigator Award; the Award for Excellence in Research from the Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions; and the Arthur Melton Early Career Award from Division 19 of the American Psychological Association.

Teaching

Dr. Artino teaches graduate courses in the Doctorate of Health Sciences (DHSc) Leadership in Clinical Practice and Education program at SMHS, and he has actively taught several other online and face-to-face courses—and has developed new graduate course materials and curricula—since 2008. In addition to teaching for SMHS and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, he has taught several online graduate courses for the University of Connecticut, the University of Cincinnati, and the University of Illinois, Chicago. He also facilitates workshops for students and faculty, supervises junior faculty, and has mentored more than 30 graduate students as a research advisor, thesis/dissertation committee member, and academic counselor.
 
Dr. Artino’s experiences as an educator have not been limited to teaching within higher education. He was a U.S. Navy instructor for 23 years. Furthermore, he has provided well-recognized teaching contributions beyond his parent institution at the national and international level, including over 40 invited workshops at diverse academic institutions such as the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, the University of British Columbia, Virginia Tech’s Carilion School of Medicine, and the University of Washington. 

Research

As primarily a quantitative researcher, Dr. Artino has been the principal or associate investigator on several funded research projects totaling more than $8 million ($3.4 million in the last 5 years alone). As a scholar in medical and health professions education, he has published 200 scientific journal articles and book chapters. His most highly cited works are a blend of research and education articles on topics ranging from analyzing and interpreting Likert-type data, understanding academic motivation and self-regulated learning among medical students and practicing physicians, measuring long-term physician outcomes, and developing questionnaires for educational research. Moreover, he has given research presentations and workshops at national and international meetings, including annual meetings of the Association of American Medical Colleges, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Association for Medical Education in Europe, American Educational Research Association, and Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, among many others. Taken together, he has conducted more than 150 invited talks, research presentations, and conference workshops on teaching, learning, and assessment for faculty and students from around the globe.
 
Dr. Artino’s programs of research focus on two interrelated goals: scientific understanding of teaching, learning, and assessment processes, and the development of practical applications to improve medical and health professions education. Thus, his research is guided by the principle that theory and research should work in synergy with educational practice, with each informing and improving the other. To this end, he employs social-cognitive views of motivation, emotion, and behavior to better understand how medical trainees learn across the educational continuum. Such an understanding is critical to the development of individualized instruction and feedback for trainees.

A secondary focus of his research has been the study of long-term physician outcomes. From 2009 to 2020, he co-directed the Long-Term Career Outcome Study (LTCOS) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. The goal of the LTCOS was to collect and analyze a variety of quantitative and qualitative data before, during, and after medical school so that university leaders could more effectively evaluate the success of their graduates and educational programs. Since 2010, the multidisciplinary LTCOS team presented three dozen research abstracts at scientific conferences and published more than 60 peer-reviewed journal articles.
 
In addition to these two lines of inquiry, Dr. Artino contributes his methodological expertise in measurement and evaluation to stimulate better survey scholarship. Surveys are widely used in medical education research; unfortunately, many researchers fail to use evidence-informed best practices when designing surveys. As a result, poorly designed surveys pervade the medical education literature. To address this problem, Dr. Artino has published several seminal articles that hone previously developed techniques and synthesize them into a cohesive survey-design process. In addition, he has introduced this systematic process to graduate medical educators through a series of articles published in the Journal of Graduate Medical Education and has given more than 40 invited, extramural talks and conference workshops on survey design.
 

Community Service

Dr. Artino has served his professional community in several important ways. In 2015 he served as the chair of the Research in Medical Education Program Planning Committee for the annual meeting of the Association of American Medical Collects. That same year he was also the co-chair for the Program Planning Committee of Division I of the American Educational Research Association. In addition, he has held major leadership positions in several other professional organizations, including the Aerospace Medical Association, American Psychological Association, and the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE). As a former member of AMEE’s Research Committee, he was one of only 15 international members responsible for leading the research initiatives for the world’s largest medical education society, representing 4,500 members from over 1,000 institutions and 150 nations. In 2019, he was inducted as a Fellow of AMEE; he is also a fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association.
 
Dr. Artino serves on the editorial review boards of several referred journals. He is deputy editor for the Journal of Graduate Medical Education, assistant editor for Academic Medicine, and associate editor for Perspectives on Medical Education. Over the past decade, he has served on several other editorial review boards, including Military Medicine, Military Psychology, the Internet and Higher Education, and the Journal of Advanced Academics.
 

Publications

View publications by this faculty member.

Park, Y. S., Konge, L., & Artino, A. R. (2020). Positivism paradigm of research. Academic Medicine, 95(5), 690-694.

Konopasky, A., Ramani, D., Ohmer, M., Battista, A., Artino, A. R., McBee, E., Ratcliffe, T. A., & Durning, S. J. (2020). It totally possibly could be: How a group of military physicians reflect on their clinical reasoning in the presence of contextual factors. Military Medicine, 185(S1), 575-582.

Barker, A. M., La Rochelle, J. S., Artino, A. R., Wiltz, S. A., Kim, L. M., & Battistone, M. J. (2020). SimLEARN musculoskeletal training for VHA primary care providers and health professions educators. Federal Practitioner, 37(1), 42-47.

Maggio, L. A., Leroux, T., & Artino, A. R. (2019). To tweet or not to tweet, that is the question: A randomized trial of Twitter effects in medical education. PLoS ONE, 14(10), e0223992. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0223992

Maggio, L. A., Artino, A. R., Watling, C. J., Driessen, E. W., & O’Brien, B. C. (2019). Exploring researchers’ perspectives on authorship decision-making. Medical Education, 53, 1253-1262.

Konopasky, A., Ramani, D., Ohmer, M., Durning S. J., Artino, A. R., & Battista, A. (2019). Why health professions education needs functional linguistics: The power of “stealth words.” Medical Education, 53, 1187-1195.

Solhjoo, S., Haigney, M. C., McBee, E., van Merrienboer, J. J. G., Schuwirth, L. W. T., Artino, A. R., Battista, A., Ratcliffe, T. A., Lee, H. D., & Durning, S. J. (2019). Heart rate and heart rate variability correlate with medical reasoning performance and self-reported measures of cognitive load. Scientific Reports, 9(1), 14668. doi: 10.1038/ s41598-019-50280-3

Cleary, T. J., Konopasky, A., La Rochelle, J. S., Neubauer, B. E., Durning, S. J., & Artino, A. R. (2019). First-year medical students’ calibration bias and accuracy across clinical reasoning activities. Advances in Health Sciences Education, 24, 767-781.

McBee, E., Blum, C., Ratcliffe, T. A., Schuwirth L. W. T., Polston, E., Artino, A. R., & Durning, S. J. (2019). Use of clinical reasoning tasks by medical students. Diagnosis, 6, 127-135.

Bynum, W. E., Adams, A. V., Edelman, C. E., Uijtdehaage, S., Artino, A. R., & Fox, J. W. (2019). Addressing the elephant in the room: A shame resilience seminar for medical students. Academic Medicine, 94, 1132-1136.

Daniel, M., Rencic, J., Durning, S. J., Holmboe, E., Santen, S. A., Lang, V. J., Ratcliffe, T. A., Gordon, D., Heist, B., Lubarsky, S., Estrada, C., Ballard, T., Artino, A. R., Da Silva, A. S., Cleary, T. J., Stojan, J., & Gruppen, L. D. (2019). A scoping review of clinical reasoning assessment tools: Providing practical guidance on the validity and feasibility of different methods. Academic Medicine, 94, 902-912.

Maggio, L. A., Dong, T., Driessen, E. W., & Artino, A. R. (2019). Factors associated with scientific misconduct and questionable research practices in health professions education. Perspectives on Medical Education, 8, 74-82.

Cook, D. A., Gas, B. L., Farley, D. R., Lineberry, M., Naik, N. D., Lara, F. J. C., & Artino, A. R. (2019). Influencing ability mindset in procedural skills learning: Two randomized studies. Journal of Surgery Education, 76, 652-663.

Artino, A. R., Driessen, E. W., & Maggio, L.A. (2019). Ethical shades of gray: International frequency of scientific misconduct and questionable research practices in health professions education. Academic Medicine, 94, 76-84.

Bynum, W. E., Artino, A. R., Uijtdehaage, S., Webb, A. M., & Varpio, L. (2018). Sentinel emotional events: The triggers, nature, and effects of shame experiences in medical residents. Academic Medicine, 94, 85-93.

Maggio, L. A., Thomas, A., Chen, H. C., Ioannidis, P. A., Kanter, S. L., Norton, C., Tannery, N. H., & Artino, A. R. (2018). Examining the readiness of Best Evidence in Medical Education Guides for integration into educational practice: A meta-synthesis. Perspectives on Medical Education, 7, 292-301.

Varpio, L., Bader, K. S., Meyer, H. S., Durning, S. J, Artino, A. R., & Hamwey, M. K. (2018). Interprofessional healthcare teams in the military: A scoping literature review. Military Medicine, 183(11-12), e448-e454.

Berman, N., & Artino, A. R. (2018). Development and validation of an online engagement metric using virtual patients. BMC Medical Education, 18, 213-220. doi: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-018-1322-z

Cook, D. A., Gas, B. L., & Artino, A. R. (2018). Measuring mindsets and achievement goal motivation: A validation study of three instruments. Academic Medicine, 93, 1391-1399.

Maggio, L. A., Leroux, T. C., Meyer, H., & Artino, A. R. (2018). #MedEd: Exploring the relationship between altmetrics and traditional measures of dissemination in health professions education. Perspectives on Medical Education, 7, 239-247.

Industry Relationships and Collaborations

This faculty member (or a member of their immediate family) has reported a financial interest with the health care related companies listed below. These relations have been reported to the University and, when appropriate, management plans are in place to address potential conflicts.

  • None