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Faculty Directory

Ahdeah Pajoohesh-Ganji Ahdeah Pajoohesh-Ganji
Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology

Office Phone: 202-994-6993
Email: Email
Department: Anatomy and Cell Biology

Education

  • B.S., George Washington University, 1997
  • PhD, George Washington University, 2005

Biography

Background

BS (1997), Major in Biology, Department of Biological Sciences. The George Washington University.
PhD (2005) Major in Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, under the mentorship of Dr Mary Ann Stepp and Dr. Ronald Donaldson. The George Washington University.
Post-doctoral training (2005-2007), Neuroscience Department, under the mentorship of Dr William Rebeck.  Georgetown University.
Post-doctoral training (2007-2010), Neuroscience Department, under the mentorship of Dr Alan Faden.  Georgetown University.

Research Scientist (2010-2013), Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology. The George Washington University.

Assistant Research Professor (2013-2020), Department of Anatomy and Regenerative Biology. The George Washington University.

Assistant Professor (2020-present), The George Washington University. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology.

Research

Dr. Pajoohesh-Ganji’s research is focused on the pathways and repair mechanisms that play a role in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). She has used different models such as spinal cord and the optic nerve to investigate questions regarding inflammation, axonal re-growth, and oligodendrocytes biology in mice and rats. Her current research focuses on demyelination and remyelination in the mouse optic nerve and spinal cord.

In addition to her research interests, she also enjoys teaching and training graduate and undergraduate students who rotate in the lab.

Teaching

Dr. Pajoohesh-Ganji is the director of “Ethics for Translational Sciences” (ANAT 6219) and the Co-Director of “Human Microscopic Anatomy” (ANAT6150) courses. She enjoys teaching undergraduate, graduate, and medical students about Ethics and Histology.

Publications

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Karl M, Garrison E, Nana Adwoa Osei-Bonsu, Cheryl Clarkson-Paredes, Julie Ahn, and Miller RH. Developmental loss of oligodendrocytes exacerbates adult CNS demyelination. Brain, Behavior, & Immunity – Health. 2020. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbih.2020.100110

Tadvalkar G, Pal-Ghosh S, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Stepp MA. The impact of euthanasia and enucleation on mouse corneal epithelial axon density and nerve terminal morphology. Ocular Surface. 2020. In press.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, and Miller RH. Targeted oligodendrocyte apoptosis in optic nerve leads to persistent demyelination. Neurochem Res. 2019. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11064-019-02754-z

Pajoohesh-Ganji A and Miller RH. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases. Neural Regen Res. 2016, 11: 886-9.

Pal-Ghosh S, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Tadvalkar G, Kyne BM, Guo X, Zieske JD, Stepp MA. Topical Mitomycin-C enhances subbasal nerve regeneration and reduces erosion frequency in the debridement wounded mouse cornea. Exp Eye Res. 2016, 146: 361-9.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Stepp MA. K14+ compound niches are present on the mouse cornea early after birth and expand after debridement wounds. Dev Dyn. 2016, 245: 132-43.

Stepp MA, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Pajoohesh-Ganji A. Syndecan-1 and its expanding list of contacts. Adv Wound Care. 2015, 4: 235-49.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Kyne BM, Saban DR, Stepp MA. Partail denervation of subbasal axons persists following debridement wounds to the mouse cornea. Lab Invest. 2015, 95: 1305-18.

Stepp MA, Zieske JD, Trinkaus-Randall V, Kyne BM, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Pajoohesh-Ganji A. Wounding the cornea to learn how it heals. Exp Eye Res. 2014, 121: 178-93.

Stepp MA, Zieske JD, Trinkaus-Randall V, Kyne BM, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Pajoohesh-Ganji A . Wounding the cornea to learn how it heals. Exp Eye Res. 2014, 121: 178-93.

Pal-Ghosh S, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Menko AS, Tadvalkar G, Saban DR, Stepp MA. Cytokine deposition alters leukocyte morphology and initial recruitment of monocytes and ??T cells after corneal injury. Inves Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014, 55: 2757-65.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Burns MP, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Hokenbury NG, Stepp MA, Faden AI.. Inhibition of amyloid precursor protein secretases reduces recovery after spinal cord injury. Brain Res. 2014, 1560: 73-82.

Whittaker MT, Zai LJ, Lee HJ, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Wu J, Sharp A, Wyse R, Wrathall JR. GGF2 (Nrg1-?3) treatment enhances NG2+ cell response and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Glia. 2012, 60: 281-94.

Wu J, Stoica BA, Dinizo M, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Piao C, Faden AI. Delayed cell cycle pathway modulation facilitates recovery after spinal cord injury. Cell Cycle. 2012, 11: 1782-95.

Wu J, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Stoica BA, Dinizo M, Guanciale K, Faden AI. Delayed expression of cell cycle proteins contributes to astroglial scar formation and chronic inflammation after rat spinal cord contusion. J Neuroinflammation. 2012, 9:169.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Pal-Ghosh S, Tadvalkar G, Stepp MA. Corneal goblet cells and their niche: implications for corneal stem cell deficiency. Stem Cells. 2012, 30: 2032-43.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Knoblach SM, Faden AI, Byrnes KR. Characterization of inflammatory gene expression and galectin-3 function after spinal cord injury in mice. Brain Res. 2012, 1475: 96-105.

Pal-Ghosh S, Blanco T, Tadvalkar G, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Parthasarathy A, Zieske JD, Stepp MA. MMP9 cleavage of the ?4 integrin ectodomain leads to recurrent epithelial erosions in mice. J Cell Sci. 2011, 124: 2666-75.

Pal-Ghosh S, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Tadvalkar G, Stepp MA. Removal of the basement membrane enhances corneal wound healing. Exp Eye Res. 2011, 93: 927-36.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Byrnes KR. Novel neuroinflammatory targets in the chronically injured spinal cord. Neurotherapeutics. 2011, 8: 195-205.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Byrnes KR, Fatemi G, Faden AI. A combined scoring method to assess behavioral recovery after mouse spinal cord injury. Neurosci Res. 2010, 67: 117-25.

Hoe HS, Fu Z, Makarova A, Lee JY, Lu C, Feng L, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Matsuoka Y, Hyman BT, Ehlers MD , Vicini S, Pak DTS, Rebeck GW. 2009. The effects of amyloid precursor protein on post-synaptic composition and activity. J Biol Chem 2009, 284:8495-506.

Byrnes KR, Stoica B, Riccio A, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Loane DJ, Faden AI. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 improves recovery after spinal cord injury in rodents. Ann Neurol. 2009, 66: 63-74.

Loane DJ, Stoica BA, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Byrnes KR, Faden AI. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGLUR5) modulates microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity by inhibiting NADPH oxidase. J Biol Chem. 2009, 284: 15629-39.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Pal-Ghosh S, Simmens SJ, Stepp MA. Integrins in slow cycling corneal epithelial cells at the limbus in the mouse. Stem Cells. 2006, 24: 1075-1086.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Stepp MA. In search of markers for the stem cells of the corneal epithelium. Biol Cell. 2005, 97: 265-276.

Pal-Ghosh S, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Brown M, Stepp MA. A mouse model for the study of recurrent corneal epithelial erosions: alpha9beta1 integrin implicated in progression of the disease. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2004, 45: 1775-1788.

Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Pal-Ghosh S, Stepp MA. Regional distribution of alpha9beta1 integrin within the limbus of the mouse ocular surface. Dev Dyn. 2004, 230: 518-528.

Stepp MA, Gibson HE, Gala PH, Iglesia DD, Pajoohesh-Ganji A, Pal-Ghosh S, Brown M, Aquino C, Schwartz AM, Goldberger O, Hinkes MT, Bernfield M. Defects in keratinocyte activation during wound healing in the syndecan-1-deficient mouse. J Cell Sci. 2002, 115: 4517-4531.

Industry Relationships and Collaborations

This faculty member (or a member of their immediate family) has reported a financial interest with the health care related companies listed below. These relations have been reported to the University and, when appropriate, management plans are in place to address potential conflicts.

  • None