SOERCE

Browse Faith Traditions

Hinduism Resources

1 - 5 shown of 14 results
Go to page: 123
Sort by: TitleDateResource type

A Dictionary of Patients' Spiritual & Cultural Values for Health Care Professionals

Primary Author: HealthCare Chaplaincy

This is "a guide that is meant to describe beliefs and practices generally found within a particular cultural or religious group." The purpose is to help healthcare providers meet the Joint Commission's requirement for addressing and maintaining patient rights for their cultural, religious, spiritual, and personal values, and religious and other spiritual practices to be accommodated. Sections include:

Western Religions: Comparison of Jewish, Christian and Muslim Traditions; Judaism; Christianity; Christian Science; Eastern Orthodox; Jehovah's Witness; Mormonism; Protestantism; Roman Catholicism; Seventh-day Adventism; Islam (Muslim); Sunni vs. Shiite

Eastern Religions: Buddhism; Hinduism; Sikhism

Other Religions: Baha'i; Native American; Rastafarian Movement; Santeria; Voodoo; Wicca

Major American Cultures: African-American/Black Culture; Hispanic-American Culture; Native American Culture

African Cultures: Somali-American Culture; Caribbean Cultures; Cuban-American Culture; Haitian-American Culture; Jamaican-American Culture

Middle East/South Asian Cultures: Arab-American Culture; East Indian-American Culture; Iranian-American Culture

East Asian Cultures: Chinese-American Culture; Filipino-American Culture; Japanese-American Culture; Korean-American Culture; Vietnamese-American Culture

Euro-Asian Cultures: Gypsy/Roma Culture; Russian-American Culture

Date Last Modified 09/01/2009 Manual/guide, Report/Document/Book chapter

A Multi-Faith Resource for Healthcare Staff

Primary Author: NHS Education for Scotland

Guide developed to provide healthcare workers with knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to the needs of the diverse faith and belief groups they may encounter in their every day work. For each faith tradition or cultural group included information is provided on: attitudes to healthcare staff and illness; religious practices; diet; fasting; washing and toilet; ideas of modesty and dress; death customs; birth customs; family planning; and blood transfusions, transplants and organ donation.

Date Last Modified 11/28/2006 Manual/guide

A Time for Listening and Caring Spirituality and the Care of the Chronically Ill and Dying

Primary Author: Christina M. Puchalski, GWish: The George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health

A thoughtful, informative, and practical guide for anyone involved in caring for the seriously and chronically ill or dying. This book covers how spiritual care can be integrated into traditional caregiving. Part one discusses aspects of spirituality, such as presence, ethics, and relationships. Part two delves into a number of specific religious and theological traditions. Part three offers practical applications and tools, including storytelling, psychotherapy, dance, music, and the arts. Part four focuses on patients' stories and reflections.

Date Last Modified 06/01/2006 Book

Bioethics for clinicians: Hinduism and Sikhism

Primary Author: Harold Coward, University of Victoria

Peer-reviewed article from the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) describing how Hindu and Sikh beliefs may impact the provision of health care. The article includes "Essential qualities of ethical approaches to communication and caregiving involving Hindu and Sikh patients" and two case examples.

Date Last Modified 11/01/2000 Article, Case example/study

Closure

Primary Author: Jonathan Weinkle, Jewish Healthcare Foundation

Closure is an initiative to change expectations for end-of-life. Our goal is to empower consumers and healthcare professionals with easy-to-access, simple-to-understand information and resources to make educated decisions about end-of-life care. The Closure website includes blogs, listings of resources, news items, and the Closure 101 curriculum.
Closure 101 is a curriculum of educational lessons dealing with an array of complex end-of-life issues including prognosis, advance planning, medical decision making, and hospice and palliative care. These difficult concepts are explained in a way that is designed to make sense to consumers. The curriculum contains 12 easy-to-follow lessons that can be viewed online or used by health educators to teach in-person. In addition to the lessons, the site contains questionnaires and information sheets that can help guide a person through the decision-making process. Guidelines for creating a Closure 101 program are available on the site.

Date Last Modified 04/04/2011 Website, Article, Continuing Education course, Course curriculum, Manual/guide
123